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statistically whether it's education or how many of them end up graduating from high school. all of that contributes to whether somebody is going to get a good job or not down the road and what their prospects are so takes vicious cycle and i think we as a culture, not just the government need to say marriage is important, children having a mom and dad is important and yes it makes a difference in their lives. >> that's true that we need to, you know, encourage people to get married and have kids within a marriage relationship so they can have two parents at home. that's the best structure. but the fact is it's very, very difficult for many of these women in the communities that they leave to live in that environment, and obviously the data is showing that is not an option. >> so what is -- what is something that really can be done about it? because i agree with genevieve about telling people they should get mered but nobody is listening. >> and i tell you i was a single mom, i am a single mom, and my kids were young and it took me a long time to find a partner but in the meantim
provide equal educational opportunities for all children in san francisco. and ms. sullivan has certainly helped to make that happen. she has been teaching math at burton high school for the past eight years, and she has truly been a leader throughout her tenure. she currently teaches advanced algebra honors, algebra and geometry. and i can tell you the impact that a teacher can have on the life of a student from my own personal experience is really tremendous. and i certainly remember my geometry teacher to this day, [speaker not understood]. not only her math lessons, but the life lessons she taughtv me stayed with me. ms. sullivan is widely respected for her innovative teaching style. she encourages her students to learn from one another through creative and collaborative approaches. and she truly expects the very best of every one of her students. she was recently nominated to be one of the -- to be recognized as one of the best teachers in san francisco, and the person that nominated her said, ms. sullivan makes the subject enjoyable and holds all of her students to the highest stand
educated myself, i trained to become a rape crisis advocate and joined a few boards, i got involved. i am so proud to be on a show that was brave enough to go into a territory that nobody else is talking about. obviously, i had my role to play on television, but after learning what i learned in hearing the statistics in receiving these letters, i knew that i wanted to do more. i wanted to play a larger role in helping survivors heal and reclaim their lives. in 2004, i started the joyful heart foundation. our mission is to heal, and power and educate survivors of the mystic, sexual assault, and child abuse. and shed light on the darkness that surrounds these issues. i get emotional. because of our ceo, we have raised more than $10 million -- [applause] thank you. let me try that again. we have raised over $10 million in private funds and served directly over 10,000 survivors and the professionals who care for them. we have connected with over one million individuals through our education and awareness initiatives and have championed crucial legislation and policy reform, which i am very pr
on yields. investors are racing to the safe haven of things. almost any conversation about education ends up coming down to money. money is the reason behind the latest and largest school closures in our nations history. chicago is closing 54 schools. can you imagine? it's an effort to shore up the billion dollar budget deficit. as shocking as this sounds, cities are facing similar meesures are in your city could be one of them. could this actually be the best medicine? joining me n is the ceo of the illinois policy institute. >> and the 2010 census, 200,000 africans left and that has been a decades long time. many are declaring that the chicago public school system, which has monopoly control over educational systems is failing. they are leaving. we have these empty scols that have to be closed. melissa: it seems a liitle too easy. some people have been saying that the schools are empty, they are curable schools, is they're not going to be overcrowding? >> chicago's population is in a long-term decline. we have the lowest population that we have had since 1920. it was built from hundreds of
to increase wellness. health education in their lives these important life enhancing services are available for all residents of san francisco regardless of able to pay. and on top of that remarkable approach to service the hospital's quality care is the best in the bay area. last year the general won the patient safety first zero hero award as well as the california association of public hospital's safety net institute quality leaders top honest a bard ask that is why it's important to support the general hospital foundation and support programs at the hospital in the following video, stephanie tom matt see and crew beatifully cap toured two of those programs and their benefits: . >> i have eniwent to a friend who was building our new home and i went to step on an attached floor and it wasn't and i fell onto concrete. when character shier came to san francisco general hospital it was clear she had very significant injuries which includeddier to her pelvis and her heel bone. san francisco general is the only trauma center in the city so if you get injured anywhere from the bridges d
the education and i think that they are generally more serious student and demand more from all of us in the classroom. >> host: in our look how to succeed in college, you have a chapter, sub chapter the liberal ivory tower. can a conservative student -- can a student who is conservative be successful, out of harvard, an american? >> guest: absolutely. let's go back and take that turn in the book to dispel the myth. these are not a bastion of liberalism that are unfriendly to conservatives. what we are s after if i'm doing my job right any student who comes in here is going to have his preexisting who views challenged whether they are liberal or conservative those kids are going to be challenged to think about what they really believe in, taken the information that we are leaving and leave with their own view in the world. if i am doing my job right that is what is happening to it and that ought to be both exciting and probably to some extent little frightening to students, no matter what their political selective is because ultimately we want them to be critical consumers of informat
of -- [unintelligible] it means i have been educated with women. when were very important for me, my grandmother, my mother. they give me and show me threw themselves an example of what women wear. women that were strong, a clever, human. and at the same time, sometimes stronger than men. so that i realized very quickly that women could be more interesting, more clever, because of maybe education or maybe because of the fact that they have not played football, to be quiet, you know, more into things to obtain. to obtain something. they have to be 10 times more clever than the men. they have everything it themselves already at the base. >> that we already know we are 10 times more intelligent. [laughter] >> yes. i mean, like, men did not realize that most of the time. even if the need. the need, you know. so that, you know, truly, i felt the power of the woman. at the time, also like the woman at sleeve and that kind of thing. we admit -- we -- women reacting on taking out the bra and putting it on fire. the fire of the bra. a symbol. showing that we are as much as the men. maybe we first tried to lo
. the requested action is that the board of education and the san francisco unified district adopts revised board policy 1000 series and include the revisions of p 120 article three relating to [inaudible] committees. /tkpwhr >> there are no public speakers. mr. wynn. >> members of the rules committee have had time to go over this so i just ask everybody to look at this. i don't know if you've done this that already. i didn't get this form until it's right here on the table. maybe i did get it sent to me, but i had gone over everything before. but this will give you a summary about what you're doing in the red column. i think the main thing is -- i think we've tried very hard to go over these and to not -- to make sure everything's included that should be included and that reflects our interactions with the school districts. so that's what i wanted to say is a lot of work's been done on this. thank you. >> any other comments. okay. roll call please. >> thank you. miss lee, miss wong, miss fewer, mr. haney, miss [inaudible], miss lee, thank you, miss mendoza, ms. norton. that's 6 is. >
that the economic philosophy of republicans has caused a massive amount of wealth for everyone. and education is ripe if reform and republican principles are perfect for minority voters. >> should i let you weigh in? >> i'm sorry. >> why are you laughing? >> you're laughing at education. expound upon your laughter on education. >> well, because its s's ridicus to try to think that the party who tried to get rid of the department of education is the one who wants to push education. it's ridiculous to think the tent that wanted to gut the teachers union want to push education. the party that wanted to take funding away from education is now the party in favor of education. that's reason i started laughing. >> those policieses worked well for you over the last 40 years. those schools that you're professing that teachers unions have a hold on on are doing really well. where school choice and charter schools that's what's doing well and voters across minority voters to voters of every ethnicity tick have seen the benefits of those kind of schools. >> by this argument, we can see how difficult the
, but not exclusively in those cities. we really are looking for some of the best practices in education and workforce development, in integration of diverse populations and affordability and quality of life issues in cities and regions and also -- and sustainability, in which encompasses a broad range of things. it's primarily environmental sustainability. the overarching theme which i think is particularly pertinent here in the bay area is regional governance and cooperation where we try to emphasize move each of our cities that they really need to figure out in their broader economic region, not just within their city limits. so how do you coordinate with the communities around you to advance some of these policy issues, whether it's transportation, environmental improvements, economic development, education systems, workforce training, etc. these are some of the issues that we really want to publicize the best practices so that practitioners such as ourselves can bring these ideas back home and really move an issue forward. i think here in the bay area, bringing this group of four european experts
. you have a big responsibility because of the events and because of the educational program, you invite people to take the bicycle on the street on a regular day, you have a big risk because your infrastructure is not yet there. so that was part of the political debate. still, i am willing to defend that policy that organizing events, this is in front of a mayor bank in the heart of brussels where the employees have been invited to come to work not by a car and to have a taste, as it says, of another mobility. it is part of the european car-free day which is organized every year, september 22, i believe it's similar to what you have in may, bike to work event. i really think those are good references. people maybe only have one day but a good experience of an alternative way to travel. i have been showing just one hour go, to go, the guidelines in english, it's our regional administration. they're very proud of it. i took one copy and showed it to some of you just this morning. it's really giving guidelines to our locate authorities on how to have the infrastructure done in a proper way
with project safe is to educate the public which i think is our primary goal right now -- that and arrested some of these thieves. these statistics are not necessarily singular events. a lot of these involve backpacks where iphones, ipods, i pads are all part of a robbery. they go steal a backpack off somebody -- i'm gonna show you an example of what happens in those types of cases. most of them are the community being somewhat aware of this iphone. so if i were to hold up $500 and just carry it like this or carry it down the street i don't think anybody would say that's a bright idea buzz that's exactly what you're doing as a victim. you're holding these things out and they're worth anywhere from $200 to $500. include that all your personal photos, your address book and they're out there and people aren't quite aware of it. we've been trying to advertise in the newspapers about the safety of these iphones in particular and we commonly see the victims have 'em out or they're texting. we have an incident where somebody was walking down the street texting and somebody came up and took
a western educated technocrat as its prime minister is in exile. after a series of car bomb blasts in iraq, media reports say x month local elections have two provinces in for at least six months. more than 50 people have been killed and 200 have been injured. the attacks coincide with the 10th anniversary of the us-led invasion of iraq. more than one dozen bombs have gone off, many during the morning rush hour. there are bombings at the best of times in other parts of iraqi, but this seems to send a message on the anniversary of the start of the war 10 years ago, the bombing of baghdad started. this morning as people were going to work, the bombings around them, one outside the green zone near the defense ministry. many in more ordinary neighborhoods. thereouth of baghdad, were several explosions, most of them geared at shia neighborhoods, marketplaces, army targets and police. as you can see around me here at the university, life has gone on. over the past 10 years despite the violence. this campus is full of students, some of whom are celebrating their graduation from the law college. w
campaigning for girls rights to an education. taliban extremists shot her in the head. since then, she has been receiving treatment in birmingham. >> at 15, she has already seized responsibility, taking her fight for education to the world stage. there's even talk of a nobel peace prize. concerns today, her are those of every other british teenager. it is all about making friends. she is doing her best. >> she herself wants to be a normal teenage girl and to have the support of other girls around her. i think that is something she has very much missed during her time in hospital. >> she will enter in your 9 -- year 9. >> today, tens of thousands of people filled st. peter's square for the first public mass of pope francis. the newly installed pontiff said out his priorities and thrilled the crowd, riding around in an open vehicle. our correspondent has the story. >> he wants his pontificate to be marked by humility, to be a pope close to the people, so gone are the bullet through screens that would separate him from the masses. he mary's the authority of the papacy with the informal sponta
, we are well trained. we do not come out there as police officers. we are into education and training. we are not looking to enforce. we tried to instill the idea that the security plan is paramount, providing the framework by which an establishment protect itself from inappropriate behavior and criminal acts for a working relationship with the community and the police. there is that umbrella of security and personnel. we looked at the management to hire the appropriate personnel. hiring, training, and supervision. everything that you need. all of our problems come from the over service of alcohol. we ask for owners to train for over service. we also look for physical security measures, like scanning. additional parking and security of the exterior is important. we think that an ongoing plan management -- constantly as cds nightclub owners assessing management. it is readjusted when necessary. the bottom line is they have a great security plan and they will limit their liability. it is all about making money and defending yourself against liability. that is what we try to preach to cl
, service providers, educators and community members. we are committed to ending human trafficking through collaboration, education, outreach, raising awareness and supporting survivors of human trafficking. how many cities have this kind of public private cooperation? i don't know but we are among the first and speaks about the efforts put forth in the city but isn't this the city where all things that are impossible can happen? i wanted to just a few people who are here. first and foremost the honorable mayor ed lee. and supervisor carmen chu, has been a great champion. the winners of the sf cat annual poster concert and the keynote speaker, -- a human traffic survivor and advocate. i want to say that other human rights commissioners are here, -- and vice chair doug chen, -- commissioner, the president julie -- nancy kirshner rodriguez, police chief greg sur (sounds like) -- i will like to turn this over to mayor lee.diana are you here? he is on his way. well - thank you. why don't we do that? why waste a moment. >> nancy did mention that we will announce the winners of the fabu
education and with legislative and regulatory agency. we provide formal and informal advice to the city of san francisco and in support of this implementation program, they set up a process where sea members. in this regard we have established a working group to participate in the implementation development of the soft frame retrofit ordinance. this working group of structural engineers have met to discuss the aspects of the ordinance. as part of this discussion the group has developed and endorses the following statements of support for the ordinance. supports the city of county of san francisco's effort to reduce risk through a comprehensive program such as thatten visioned by the safety implementation program and -- can be effective towards risk reduction goals and we'll continue to develop technical criteria appropriate for the ordinances purpose and intent. we will also continue to support the city's implementation of the ordinance through education and guidance of engineers and other stake holders. we look forward to continue our relationship with the county and city of san franc
on and on with this lock em up mentality and people nod their heads. if people are better educated about these issues they will call the people on the carpet and say wait a minute. i think the mission, if i can give you that, would be to step outside your circle, your work circle and bring this issue to the broader public so they can create a change in the culture and the public's response to these issues that will then enable the politicians and legislators to make the reforms to the finances and the court's etc that really need to happen and one way i think is a good way to do that and i'm talking, i'm a journalist, an advocacy journalist, it's usually said with a sneer but i wear the badge proudly, to reach out to reporter's because of course they do have that soapbox to share these stories with. so reach out to reporter's in your local newspapers, crime reporter's, whoever, and just invite them to spend the day with you. invite them to spend a day looking at just a day in your life as a public defender, a day in the life of you as a parole officer, whatever it is. and it's a tradition journalist
to re-education camps for up to four years of hard labor for even minor offenses. it's known as re-education through labor. there are believed to be more than 300 of these facilities around the country with tens of thousands of inmates. until recently, little was known about the system but now chinese are starting to speak out against conditions they call inhumane. >>> seven years ago, this woman spoke about her protest to the authorities. she wants to continue to protest the local authorities, claiming she had been driven off her land illegally. five years later, she was seized by the police and sent to a correction facility without any trial. she was sent for one year of reeducation through labor. after being released in 2012, she committed suicide. she left behind two daughters. they say their mother was driven to despair by all she went through during the year of hard labor. they told nhk that she took her life last autumn by swallowing pesticide. >> translator: my mother just wanted to set the record straight. we're sad and angry at what happened. >> reporter: the harsh conditions in th
organizational effectiveness and improved doctrine, education, training and exercises. the directive comes with an already increased attention on dsca which we have seen the development of courses and training now delivered at multiple professional military education programs and other venues and the maturing of thinking and policies since 9/11 and katrina. there is a recognition within this analysis that there are gaps in awareness of the capabilities dod can provide in complex catastrophes, as well as the inherent complexities and lack of understanding in our various chains of command and our authorities. the report recognizes what we have used to drive the dsca portion of fleet week, that local authorities are likely to be overwhelmed in a complex catastrophe and that the president will direct support to civil authorities. that san francisco fleet week assumption is now stated as a guiding principle inside the dod for planning and activities. the objective of the dod effort is to enable the effective access to and use of defense capabilities in the event of a disaster. critical to thi
like free education but we need to talk about this, right. we need to talk about how we can do that. and the final thing we learn om this is that we have to build preventive structures and processes so that this thing won't happen again. you think it won't happen again but so did the japanese think it wouldn't happen. who would think that the japanese haven't done anything. how would they be in camps. look at what is happening to the muslims or under the patriot act. people just pushed away. who would think america would do that? the outsiders, no telling what they will do. we have been the moral and social vanguard of this country. we have struggled, at one with our allies, victories that not only benefited us but extended the realm of freedom in this country. we cannot remain silent when other people are suffering. [applause] we feel -- i will talk about his morning minute. we feel we might hurt our president. back to it and do more with it. first, we have to continue the struggle against our form of slavery. psychological and chemical. against all forms of oppression. , sexism an
. next comes compensation. , butuld be not just money free health. free education. we need to talk about how to do that. [applause] we learn from this is that we have to deal with structures so that this thing will not happen again. you think it won't happen again , but so did the japanese. they did not think it would happen. if they didn't do anything, how did they end up in internment camps? how about the patriot act? they could not be mentioned. who would think america would do that? the outsiders, no telling what they will do. we have been the moral and social vanguard of this country. we have struggled, at one with our allies, victories that not only benefited us but extended the realm of freedom in this country. we cannot remain silent when other people are suffering. [applause] simply because we feel -- i will talk about this more in a minute. we feel we might hurt our president. i will get back to it and do more with it. first, we have to continue the struggle against our form of slavery. psychological and chemical. against all forms of oppression. racism, classism, sexism and al
education to national parks to meals on wheels. $1.2 trillion in cuts over ten years. >> stephen: yeah, but it won't be that bad because there's no way america is going to last ten years. we have two tops. [laughter] obama is trying to scare us into responsible behavior. >> thousands of teachers and educators will be laid off. air traffic controllers and airport security will see cutbacks which means more delays at airports across the country. emergency responders, their ability to help communities respond to and recover from disasters will be degraded. federal prosecutors have to close cases and let criminals go. >> stephen: don't believe him nation, obama is trying to convince us the sequester is a terrible problem when in fact it's a terrible solution. it was born back in 2011 when obama wanted to raise the debt ceiling. the amount that america can borrow to pay its bills. it's sort of like raising the credit limit on your visa to pay off your mastercard if you had used your mastercard to pay for two trillion-dollar wars. but -- listen, wait. [cheers and applause] they were worth it
to the senate floor. gregg? >> growing concerns over higher education in the united states as new numbers suggest the level of student loan debt is reaching crisis proportions. according to the federal reserve bank of new york, americans now hold a total of nearly a trillion dollars in student loan debt, as an average of $23,000 per person and that could take an advantage person roughly tn years to pay off, maybe more. joining us now the reverend jesse jackson, founder and president of the rainbow push coalition. i know you're deeply concerned about this, in part because i read your recent column on the problem. how do we solve it. >> well, it's more about a trillion dollars, more than credit card debt, so many youth who have able minds will not apply and those in school cannot stay in. and in black colleges about 15,000 fewer this year and some, the money without necessarily the grade. and some grades can't because of the money and that undermines our future capacity to compete. >> gregg: part of the problem is that the price of a four-year college education has really skyrocketed. i loo
to thank my colleagues in the education department in the fine arts museum of san francisco for an allowing me to speak today. valuable artwork -- rene, director of public programs and last on this list but certainly not least gregory stock who is a programming wizard. i'm so grateful for their individual and collective support. i would also like to thank the production manager who is behind-the-scenes somewhere. he's waving. our production manager consistently provide patient and reliable technical support which is beyond value when lecturing to large audiences like those of you gathered today. without further a do, i'm honored to share with you today paintings that comprise the exhibition here at the museum. girl with a pearl earring, from january 26-june 2nd the museum will be the first venue in the american tour of paintings from the royal picture gallery which is located in haik. how many have individual painting in the normal home? a good number of you. this unique museum is often called the jouleewelry box. it has the world's most prestigious paintings from the morris house which to
for the board of education for tuesday march 12, 2013 is now called to order. roll call please. thank you. >> thank you. /phaoez join me in the pledge of allegiance. can i hear second? thank you. this is for january 22, 2013. roll call please. >> thank you. miss lee, my wong, mr. haney, miss mendoza, miss nor tan. item b. present to the board. >> thank you president norton. good evening. a few comments for tonight. or school site planning was held on march 2. it was very attended. i want to thank everyone that attended. this was an opportunity for everyone to learn about the district's goals moving forward and how to create a plan for how our sites will allocate and use their resources. if you were not able to attend this year's summit, we look forward to seeing you next year. in the meantime, we encourage parents to have a robust conversation about using resources aligned to budget priorities. we also urge you to look at the school's website where the powerpoint presentations talking about the district goals are also going to be posted. i believe they're already posted so we
ever and go to the mayor's office education you'll find applications for nominations in /kphaoeu these, spanish >> so the next meeting of the rules policy and legislation committee will be on march 20 and starts at 6:30. >> i would also like to announce that our second meeting in march is cancelled, so the meeting of march 26 will not take place and notice of cancellation will be posted. now miss williams, you have a small announcement. >> i just wanted to have it on public record to acknowledge the district staff, the families out in bay view on march 1 -- to me -- amazing they had 800 people turn out, father and mother hi members, students to go to the california academy of science and to me those are the kind of things that need to be acknowledged from the ground work up and and the participation of that many people. 800 showed up, district provided the bussing and i think we need to see more of that. and in terms of reaching the african american community an where we wanna be heading. >> that is definitely worth mentioning. thank you. >> any other reports are board members. >> i
in san francisco. you know that this city's future don't understand on the education we provide for all our children. it's with great pleurisy introduce the mayor of the city of san francisco. good morning thank you laura republican for that kind introduction and thank you for opening your divorces to me this morning. i want to honor david and all your supervisors and to our two newest supervisors. mayor brown thank you for being here and taking the time to join us this morning. you have done so much in this county >> and since this is my first city address i'm hoping you'll cut me some slack if you chose to write about it in the newspapers. to the department heads and consistent leaders and education leaders to all of you who are online and thank you all of you for joining us this morning. and, of course, to my wonderful wife, mother and friend thank you for being here and pitting up with me for all these years >> a year ago i stood before i and score my term of office pledging to seize the year of the dragon to focus on jobs and to make bold decisions for your future. and to work to
their children exposed to witchcraft and sex education, both taught in schools. >> they were encouraged to ask the devil to help. >> we found out what is in the textbooks. exactly the opposite of what the bible tells us and teaches us. illegal in germany. persecuted, fines, jail or loss of their children. most home schoolers are left alone by the government. against home schooling. in those nations where it is illegal, home schoolers risk losing their children. two of the worst nations are germany and sweden. if you would like to see what it would be like if it was banned in america if it was banned, come to sweden. this family had to take their family to finland in exile. >> we were forced out of our country. that make as stronger impact than i can imagine. this is our country. now we are pushed away from it. >> sweden is the toughest places to home school. michael donnelly of the home school administration. president of the nordic committee for human rights calls it a dictatorship where social workers tell parents what to do. >> they claim to be a democracy, far from it. it is a dictatorship
of education creating and filling a new job and pays six figures. and washington correspondent byron york joins us and the reason is, this is probably after the sequestration. >> it is, it's the white house initiative on educational excellence for african-americans, it was created by executive order. >> greta: the president did it. >> he created it himself, by the president last year. it was placed in the education department, pay is about $124,000 a year and it's just been filled. >> greta: after march 1st? >> after march 1st and sequestration takes effect. what you have when you have the czars or coordinators or whatever you want to call them, it's an admission that the federal government has a lot of programs that are spending a lot of money that aren't well-coordinated and aren't working together well and the president feels he needs to appoint somebody to do that. right there it's kind of an admission the whole system is a little bloated. >> greta: after everything else is cut march 1st and when he created by executive order we knew sequestration was likely to happen within six or seven mo
almost four years ago as an educational arm of their work. and we would have dinners and a few classes and we understood there what momentum that people wanted this type of engagement and education in a way that allowed for a more in-depth conversation. we grew and now we offer -- i think we had nine, we have a series where adults learned home cooking and we did a teacher training workshop where san francisco unified public school teachers came and learned to use cooking for the core standards. we range all over the place. we really want everyone to feel like they can be included in the conversation. a lot of organizations i think which say we're going to teach cooking or we're going to teach gardening, or we're going to get in the policy side of the food from conversation. we say all of that is connected and we want to provide a place that feels really community oriented where you can be interested in multiple of those things or one of those things and have an entree point to meet people. we want to build community and we're using food as a means to that end. >> we have a wonderful or
turn to two percent of your monthly income. >> you can enroll in free educational services online. just as it -- visit sfsmartmoney.org. with services like financial education classes and one-on-one meetings with advisers, asset smart money network makes it easy for you to learn all you need to know about managing, saving, investing, and protecting your money. the network offers access to hundreds of financial aid programs. to help their eruptions, fill out the quick questionnaire, and you will be steered to the program you are looking for. >> who want to make sure everyone has the chance to manage their money successfully, keep their money safe, and avoid getting ripped off. >> it sounds very good. i think people should try that one. >> to find out more, visit sfsmartmoney.org or call 211 and ask about the bank on s.f. program. >> now you can have a bank account. open one today. tape 55 >> welcome, this is carl. >> great to meet you. >> great to me you, and i want to thank you for your interest and this is the city's animal shelter. and come in and a lot of people come here to adopt a
, or the end of men. more women than men get a college education, women are for the first time in the majority in the workplace, in managerial positions. so it's very hard for us to look back to that other time. and i was, you know, even though abstractly understand that things were different, we don't know, um, we we can't really see and feel it exactly. i interviewed janet malcolm for the paris review, and she told me that when she was in college, she had not a single woman professor. and i was just shocked. even though i know that life was like that, it was kind of astonishing to me. so my first question i was going to ask our two panelists who were alive for the feminine mystique to just describe for a moment one, um, your experience when you first read the book, and it is overblown or exaggerated to say that this book changed people's lives? >> oh, i don't think there's any question. i mean, of course, it changed people's lives. it's till changing people's lives. it is passed down true the culture. and it was the greatest social revolution probably since the suffragists. and that movement
especially the president of our san francisco board of education thank you richard important being here. she's all of our school and everybody. lucille thank you for being here. i'm so excited. i'm so excited you, you know, tomorrow the giants starts and i hope some of you are going to be here. i still can't stop celebrating the series in san francisco. two times the last few years this time it was a sweep. when i asked the owner and the whole organization can we work with you? i've been part of an ed lee sweep but not a world series sweep. we took that idea and something that hunter did with all the other players when they won the series they said something that will never leave my mind about this great ball team. they played for each other. and that's what i wanted to make sure the giant sweep meant to us. the world class students, residents, businesses we want to play important each other. we want to make sure others are always welcome. we know that if we keep the trash off our streets it will make us provided and maybe a world series with the giants. yes as well as you'll our others spor
so frequently face discrimination in everyday life. in all aspects of their life. from education, employment and health care, to all of their social relationships. as a result it's harder for them to stay healthy, to get health care insurance coverage, and to get the health care they need. here at cap we are leveraging implementation of the affordable care act help eliminate barriers that keep the and transgender people in the with hiv from achieving the highest animal health care needs, health care that they need. in particular, our lgbt stated change project is working in states across the country to support better data collection, better consumer protection, comprehensive and reliable insurance benefits, and a successful implementation of the medicaid expansion. when you look at the affordable care act, you know, those on the right complained that it is a bit of social engineering. and what it really is is trying to ensure that we cover all americans and provide them with good coverage. we should also look at the aca as an opportunity to expand basic rights for the lesbian, ga
to acknowledge that and bring that into the conversation. and we also try to give back by creating educational and networking eventsed. before i go on, i just wanted to share a few comments. as we began our planning for 2013, we solicited from our email list, some comments both on the attendees' past experience and how it's impacted their business? and kind of the things that they would like to see? a few of those comments when we asked if you attended san francisco small business week in 2012, did your business benefit from attending and if so, how? yes, excellent training, great networking opportunities. great ideas, great information. yes, i attended absolutely my business was improved. i met incredible vendors, mentor and resources to tap as i go, clear, precise and helpful and timely information regarding the business of doing business. and increased self-confidence as i realized i knew more than i gave myself credit for as an entrepreneur. and my favorite one is, "yes, i was not aware there were so many organizations that would help people to start a business." so we feel really good
of private housing, employment, education, meaningful relationships, as well as social participation. in addition, we will be working with the centers for medicare and medicaid services to develop, refine, and strengthen policies that promote independent living among all populations, especially those served by medicaid. we would also look with cms to promote home and community-based services and support. last but not least, i will be remiss if i forget to mention that may is also the time of the year when communities across nations come together to celebrate the older americans month. the proud tradition that shows our nation's commitment to recognize is the -- recognizing the contributions and achievements of our seniors. the theme for this year is "never too old to play." we want to encourage older americans to be engaged, active, and involved in your own lives and in your own communities. in closing, thank you so much for inviting me to speak at your summit. we wish everyone the very best, and we want to commend san francisco for again launching this important event today, and tha
to apologize for. first thought wrong properly filtered was some kind of rehabilitation or education or part of the c.o. or the p.d. or the d.a., helps first thought wrong become next right thing. you can do it. i can teach the incarcerated population what to want because they always get what they wanted. they wanted more, they got more. they got it, they got it. they want someday, they left with none. they wanted her or him, they got that. i can tell them what to want now. pass first thought wrong, what to want. they do the right work, i can show them how to keep it this time. my boy's safe all day. it's not because of me. it's because of efforts like this. [applause] >> as our panelists take the stage and get seated, let me introduce our discussion. earlier this year, california state senator mark leno introduced legislation that would revise the penalty for simple drug possession under the state law, making drug possession laws that punish as a felony would now be punished as a misdemeanor. the new legislation, sb-1506, does not apply to anybody involved in selling or manufacturing drugs.
, elected officials, educators, law enforcement officials and leaders from the private and public sector, all of whom have traveled here from washington, dc from sacramento and all over the bay area. so thank you for being here today. we are grateful for an opportunity to come together with you to create schools and communities where young people are healthy and safe and feel welcome and they are allowed to learn and they are allowed to thrive. this day is devoted to help all of us deepen our understanding of this issue of the problem through data, through research, through anecdotes, to put real solutions in place, to comply with new state and draw laws on bullying and to measure our progress. it's a promise we want to join you in keeping to our children and our youth in california. some of you know that we started this summit yesterday with a screening of the documentary film, bully, to 3,000 students in san francisco from san francisco's public schools. the superintendent of schools you're going to hear from in a minute, he was there, i know ter theresa sparks was there, i was so
will get jobs because of your education but many will pay $200,000 and get little more than that. this is why dale stephens dropped out and has the web site uncollege.org and his book hack education. what do you mean? there is a reason people go to college. >> that is what society says you need to do but that means you have to learn what they tell you the not what you want to interest you. john: i just want comic books and girls i wouldn't have learned anything. >> maybe you start a comic book about girls. [laughter] >> you tell me your doing better? >> there is a community around the world who is actively doing creative things with their education one dropped out now is an artist and getting commissions. summer building solar powered computers but without paying the high cost of college. i did not go to middle school or high school. john: your parents let you leave school? >> they were not fans of the idea but i thought if i leave for one year what is the big loss? if i go back school will be there. john: you even took college courses? you could just not pay? >> professors were
spending to balance the budget by 2023. >> the california department of education is expanding it's list of recommended reading for kindergarten through 12th grade. that includes newly published works dealing with sexual identity issues. here is nannette miranda in sacramento. >>> as summer nears, educators want to keep kids reading. california department of education up updated the list of books that is to prepare students for college, klutd for the first time are winners of the stone wall book award that recognizes gay, lesbian, bisexual and transgender literature. >> it's good to teach kids that everyone is different and we can all be accepted who we are. i think it's great to see those books recommended. >> the books are recommended according to age from young kids activity books celebrating gay rights leader harvey milk to books like older kids like transgender teens and totally joe a boy coming out. >> there is a full sexual war. >> social conservatives are appalled. they say such topics have no place on the state's official reading list. >> they are not being taught critical think
he calls the pharmacy. he believes education needs to be cared. a lot of people in lower and higher education are essentially the same thing that we should be spending our first teaching people how to find stuff, how to find information. this is different from knowing things. so if i took all the electricity away and there's a blackout, yet no electricity for weaker to me can ask my students if your devices don't work, what do you know? the answer is they'll tell me not much because i need to be a defined as. studies done by psychologists in which she said if you ask people to do a google search and later you ask them what they found, they're better at remembering how they thought the search path and they are remembering the content. someone if it happens to bless google, i couldn't live without it. what it's doing is redefining what it means to know. if you students raised not just because it ologies, people in education say we should learn how to do things. one should be part of the 21st century generation so we raising a generation of people to believe what matters is you can fin
the seventh fittest economy in the world. we're ranked 34th in primary education and health care. our macro economic environment is 111th. that cannot be right. our next guest says the notion that we're losing our competitive edge is widespread and pervasive, it is not necessarily correct. ed mcbride is the washington bureau chief for the author of the special ro on america competitiveness. welcome, sir. >> thank you for having me. >> would you like to tell me, and i welcome the message that things are not as bleak as we've been told. please. talk us off the ledge. >> well, as you said, there is a the love hand wringing, a lot of reports. these dire statistic that's seem so dreadful. it is almost impossible to remember they're true. 111th? that's to do with the size of the national debt basically. but what all these gloomy sort of hand wringing accounts neglect, they focus on washington and on gridlock and on the failure to resolve all the questions about the budget and they don't look at what's going on in the rest of the country. the good news is, that in the rest country, people aren't s
, educate and inform themselves. >> that's an interesting point. most people would think the opposite. putting my money in a bank is not risky. putting it into an index fund, which is a basket of stocks, is risky. comes down to people's fear. no guts. worried about the market. the market is volatile and it's risky. what do you do when people tell you that? >> it's the thing about fear and ignorance allowing us to dictate financial decisions. we should never allow that. nothing wrong with being ignorant, something wrong with staying ignorant. we should never be scared of something you don't know about. a lot of individuals are scared of something because they have not put pun in the market. what i ask is what other alternatives do you have? show me another that can give you a 13.2% return. for a three-year average, what is what the dow jones gave us in the past three years. you show me another that can give that type of return or security. what we have to do, this is what lewis has been doing for years, what i have been doing for years, directly addressing and making sure you know ther
the budget by 2023. >>> the california department of education is expanding its list of recommended reading for kindergarten through twelve grade and it includes newly published works dealing with sexual identity issues. here's abc7 news capital correspondent nannette miranda in sacramento with the story. >>> as summer nears, educators want to keep kids reading. the california department of education just updated its list of more than 7,800 recommended books. meant to prepare students for college and the ever-changing world. included for the first time are winners of the stone wall book award which recognizes lesbian, gay, bi-sexual and transgender literature. >> it's good to teach kids that everyone is different and we are all people and we can all be accepted for who we are. i think it's great to see those books being recommended. >> the books are recommended according to age. from young kids activity books celebrating gay rights leader harvey mills to books for older kids like i am jay, and totally joe, telling about a boy coming out. >> there's a full-scale war, a sexual war. >> social
are learning a lot. some will get jobs because of your education, but many of you will pay 200,000 dollars and get little more than debt. the reason dale stevens founded the web site uncollege.org. how to get ahead without college. in the book half of your education is sub titled ditch the lectures save ten's of college and learn more than your peers ever will. what do you mean learn more than your peers. there's a reason they go to college. >> they go to college because you are told to. society says this is what you need to do in order to be successful in your life. you have to learn exactly what they tell you not necessarily the things that you want to learn or interest you. >> i just wanted to learn comic books and about girls, i wouldn't have learned anything if i didn't have a college directing me. >> maybe you would have started a comic book about girls. >> people go to your web site and tell you you helped me drop out and i am doing better? >> we have a community of 10,000 people around the world who are doing creative things with your education instead of going to school. there's p
the crac, has not been educate along the way. i think an organization like the national endowment for financial education is a great resource to start from. i don't believe that wall street is always the best place to get educated. so there's a start, a place to start a plan. melissa: yeah. >> next thing have someone hold you accountable. meet with somebody. i like pat's idea, find a financial buddy. we often work out with a buddy to help us out. find a financial advisor and somebody you can work with. melissa: that makes sense. you say saving 15 to 20% of your annual income. i wonder at what price? saving aside 20% of the your income, does that mean you don't buy a house, you rent instead? would you set aside the income and use credit cards and rack up debt so you can save? at what price, how seriouous is it to save that much money. >> how serious is that individual, that's the question. because let's put this in reference. this individual that in our scenario, sob who is 50 to 60 years old or so, they're really at the peak of their financial succs. they're making the most they e
99 weeks. these folks have been out of work two years, three, even four. they're college-educated professionals in their 40s or 50s, people who thought their company would take them all the way to retirement. vernon? >> i was very angry. i was very bitter. i was fed up with society, the corporate world, the lies, deceit, the greed. >> they don't look it, but they have fallen out of the middle class, turned in cars, gone on food stamps, taken kids out of college, and faced foreclosure. now, they've pinned their last hopes on joe carbone. >> the word "carnage" is a strong word, but i can't think of a better word in this case. and i-- what aggravates me is that there isn't outrage. we ought to be angry. we ought to be giving every moment of our time figuring out how we're gonna restore for them the american dream. >> joe carbone is president of something called the workplace. it's the state unemployment office in southwest connecticut where people get job training and placement help. carbone has a reputation for innovative job programs, but he has never seen so many people out of wor
-- lgbt community. the benefits and what is in play. outreach education and enrollment. you have to inform them of their choices and provide ways to help enroll new coverage where it is available. scaling of the workforce is how we can help with this. how will the care be monitored, and medicaid expansion decisions, health insurance exchanges and ultimately the future of ryan white. i will wrap up now and review of some of these thoughts with what the panel has to say. thank you. [applause] >> thank you, for that thoughtful overview. we are going to move now to our panel discussion. our moderator this morning is the advisor for lgbt policy and racial justice and director of the fire initiative that explores the impact of public policy on gay and transgender people of color. >> good morning, everyone. thank you for providing a great overview for us on how this benefits lgbt people and people living with hiv. includes the principles of universal design. some are marginalized among us and we are helping to work to get a system that works for everyone. we are we're going to talk about what we
a better education than you. and in fact, the reverse is happening. women entering the work force are often better educated, with more academic and trade certifications than men who are doing it. and women are also doing hard and dangerous jobs. we can look to what they do in the military. they can look at how we see them as firefighters and police officers and prison guards. under the legislative i am proposing, no longer will women be on their own and fighting for equal pay or for equal work. in this country, we say work hard and play by the rules, you'll get ahead. we work hard every day but we find that the rules are different for women and for men. actually, the rules in many workplaces are rigged against us. so, mr. president, i would hope that we would pass my amendment today that would allow us to be able to go forward later on in the year and pass paycheck fairness. it is important to the women in the workplace and it's important to our economy. much is being said here about being pro growth. who isn't pro growth? of course we want to grow our economy. and if we look at the tax str
's for cancer or paving roads or education or any other worthy project, there's going to be less money if we don't address the spending problem. particularly if we don't address mandatory spending. and i ask them: have you looked to do what every family has had to do, what every business has had to do during this four years of tepid growth and coming out of this recession, which just seems to linger and linger and linger. 23 million people out of work. have you looked at ways in which you can make your spending and your administration of the budget which you oversee, can you make that more efficient and more effective? are there things you can cut? are there programs you can eliminate that no longer are effective or perhaps shouldn't have been there in the first place? are there things that you would like to do but without the resources, you're not able to do at this time, so you have to set them aside? so if the family is faced with lower revenue or dad is, his job, his salary has been cut or mom has lost her second job or for whatever reason they're having a hard time making payments -- educat
the educator teaches by collaboration rather than by instruction. woman: is it dark in there? hello. i'm joanne hendrick, author of the whole child and your guide to this video series. in this program, we're going to look at what we call cognitive development and what we can do to enhance our children's ability to think, reason, remember information, and solve problems. we'll observe children in a number of different programs-- head start, family day-care homes, university schools, and private child-care centers-- and we'll listen to their teachers as they describe some of the methods they use to enhance their children's learning. what's in there? what is that? [bell jingling] what is it? what is it? is it a sponge? hendrick: the foundations of learning begin right here because children begin to learn right from the start. the most important thing i believe we can teach our children, no matter what their age, is that they are valued. hi. hi. hi, sweetie. oh, no! ♪ one wheel's off, and the axle's broken ♪ ♪ one wheel's off, the axle's broken ♪ ♪ one wheel's off, the axle's broken ♪
to them. >> a lot to them if you're trying to piece together a college education, not large in terms of the big picture, but because of the sequester, the department of education said that these grants are cut and new grants are cut by 38% across the board. anytime a new grant if it was $5,000 before, it's about $2,000 less than that. >> greta: here is what i don't get. this is almost 40% cut. and 38% cut. explain if the sequester was 2.4% cut across the board, why are the young people taking it at 38%, this cut? how, i would think they would have 2.4%. two things going on the. one it's spread over a shorter period of time. we're halfway into the fiscal year so that 2.4% cut has to actually go into effect over a shorter period of time. >> greta: make it 4.8 or 4.8 then. >> the other thing, there are things in the sequester that are called off making sure the men and women in afghanistan and iraq themselves aren't in harm's way. and vast majority of military spending not cut. so when there are programs that are targeted they take the disproportionate chunk of the hit and that's the po
she's tried to influence the education policy and i enjoy talking with her and even more so the older sister who had gone to india to become involved with children who would not have had an education and all the issues related to that. i thought this was interesting and worst doing so i decided the best option was to offer myself to become a nun so at the age of 17 i spoke to the reverend mother to say i decided to become a nun. she said think about it. go away for a year then be will receive you. my parents were very happy with my choice because i honored to be a nun and they're happy to have me another year. they decided nothing was too good for their daughter said they thought they would send me to paris for one year. [laughter] that changed everything. [laughter] i describe that in detail in the book. [laughter] and they came under a different influence. i had a grandfather retired earlier and what he practiced with the pork guy against the landlord and he was pleased to have a young girl who was interested in what he was talking about. he did not know how to speak to a child and
and medicare and interest on the debt. all the cuts that are coming are .oming out of education it is hurting the economy. you have got to come up with the plan to came the growth of entitlements -- to tame the growth of the entitlements. >> i am very intuitive could i have the sense that charles is exasperated by what you said. >> pardon me, charles. >> he has been in office for a term and three months. he knows what the problem is. he is not a stupid man. he spoke about this openly in 2010, saying that medicaid is unsustainable and the cuts at the edges are not going to work one. what evan is asking, i suspect that he is exasperated, too, is why hasn't he done anything? the only reason he is doing the charm offensive is to manage the poll numbers. >> i think the democrats are a big problem for him. they do not want to change social security. social security was started at a time when life expectancy was 65 years old. >> it seems that all is good begin with our foundational document as the constitution, and the second man and says the right to bear arms shall not be infringed. >> i have stud
that his dream and his words and the education that we have from dr. king stays alive for generations to come. so, this is truly an amazing event today. dr. king in 1967 asked, where do we go from here? and today we're still asking that same question. where do we go from here? well, we still have people suffering in our community, people in the african-american community. where do we go from here when we have lost numbers of african americans in san francisco? where do we go from here? well, i'll tell you where we go from here. (applause) >> we change policy of the city. we change policy, and we start to be progressive, truly progressive about the policies we push to make african americans feel welcomed in this city. so, where do we go from here? we start to make aggressive efforts to educate our young people. we take ownership of our community. we take ownership of our children. we support each other instead of pointing the finger. where do we go from here? (applause) >> there is much work to do. as supervisor cohen and i cannot do it alone, we need your support. we need your encoura
society and educated -- and education, which are the severely handicapped people who are in severe poverty. >> he makes a very good point about helping disabled people across the world. we should make sure that the framework we look up properly includes the people he says. on the wider issue of the budget, i know it's contentious. i know it's difficult to i believe we should break a promise we made to the poorest people in our world. and i would also say, to those who have their doubts come of course, there is a strong moral case for a budget, but there is also a national security case. it is remarkable that broken countries, countries affected by conflict, they have not met a single millennium goal between them. by helping to mend these entries, often by security work and aid work am i we can help them. >> in 1997, there were no excess deaths at staffordshire hospital. it was an until 2002 that there were 20 excess deaths. labor health secretary after liver health secretary did nothing. in total, 1197 excess deaths occurred. some of them were asians who died in their own feces -- some of
for no. 2 and this is the third or fourth year in a row that the quality of public education came out no. 2 and i think when people talk about small business issue, they don't think about that one. no. 3, no surprise, regulations. no. 4, taxation. no. 5, this is another one that i find can kind of interesting. last year it was actually no. 4, but infrastructure. small businesses are concerned about infrastructure, and it's been borne out again by the survey. as far as some of the interesting specifics of the respondents, 48% provide health insurance, 52% did not provide health insurance. interestingly enough and maybe i will talk a little bit more, 74% almost had never heard of the small business tax credit. 63% had never talked to their state senator. their assembly person or to the governor, which i think is a little scary and it's something that hopefully you as a commissioner will re[tpo-rpbs/] that we reinforce to our representatives. those who did need capital 2:1 and those who couldn't get capital versus those who can't get capital. so it's clearly a problem for those who need i
the reauthorization of proposition h or the public education enrichment fund and the children's fund, is that right? >> that's correct, supervisor. we certainly discussed what made the most sense to assume, but given the significant interest and the importance of both of those funds, we assumed that both of them would be reauthorized and to the degree that they were -- if they were not to be reauthorized, that would change the projection. >> and given how voters of overwhelmingly supported the children's fund and prop h over the years, hopefully that's a good assumption. there is an amount of money that as the trigger has been pulled for the public education enrichment funds that i think is over 100 million and i know a couple of my colleagues said that amount should be paid back to the school district, but can you explain how prop h operates and if it's recuperates, we don't have to pay that back to the school district. >> so, the way the charter works is if proposition h were not renewed or reauthorized, then the city would owe -- would be required to repay all of the amounts that it had deferred
is the foundation of your case and you have to go in there and do that to educate the jury and to educate the judge. a lot of these people and the judge have never been in front and had to deal with a gravanis type case. the information should be consistent. you have defense attorneys that start going through 2 or 3 our 4 cases and they hear the same thing and they hear somebody professing to be an expert and this guy does not know, it puts a big hole in his expertise right off so we wanted to have something consistent. now, if you properly present this information, it will easily establish the officer as a credible expert and at that point you can start rendering expert decisions. trainings that you go to should be set up in such a way that every jurisdiction has an expert. sometimes you have to piggyback on somebody else's expertise while you learn, but there's no reason that every jurisdiction can't have an expert in gravanis and that's going to come in handy when he's talking to city hall people about allocation of resources, to his department about allocation of resources, when he decides h
that is required by formula. the public education services baseline, we need to maintain the level of funding that was provided to the school during the years during that 6.7 million and then here are the amounts for the public education enrichment fund. so, taken together, all of these baselines amount to 450 million dollars of discretionary funds. and then similar to those baselines, we have others that are specified to be certain percentages of certain taxes, so you have parking tax and property tax are the ones, so mta receives 80% of parking tax in lieu, and what that means is that the parking tax comes into the general fund and we give mta general fund money in the same dollar amount, so that amounts to 61 million dollars, similarly with the library, 2.5% of property tax, this is an additional 37 million, open space, 37 million, the children's fund of 44.7 million, the municipal symphony, 2 million, and then the hotel tax as we discussed earlier, 88 million that is then budgeted, 56 million of that is budgeted in the general fund. >> so, the open space fund is getting an additional 37 m
in the workplace. your reaction? > > my reaction is that these are very privileged women, highly educated, with many opportunities. i do not believe that they are an expression of women today. most people say, in terms of marissa mayer, that, if you want productivity, you let people work from home because they have more time, more energy and more flexibility; and if you want innovation, then you bring them all together. and i think a combination of those two things is the best way to support an institution, a culture, and a business. on the other hand, i am very concerned about it. i think the issue is that women are empowered. we do not- > sandberg you are talking about? > > yes. we do not get our power from men, we do not get our power from others, we do not have to accommodate or manipulate to become empowered. we do have the education, we have the experience, we have the knowledge, and we are empowered. so i believe that i am in opposition to the position of both of those two women. > let me ask you about sexism. there is blatant sexism in countries such as india or afghanistan- > > a
. >>> an american educated i.t >>> 300,000 people have celebrating with the new pope. he says he will lead a humble church that will help the poor. the followers for in the square, and he was elected last week by a secret conclave of cardinals. he then entered st. peter's basilica. he received the ring known as the fisherman's ring. it bears the image of st. peter holding two keys. he called on economic and social leaders to protect the people and the environment. pope francis indicated he will build a closer relationship with followers, raising expectations for reform within the catholic church. >>> an american educated i.t. manager will become the prime minister for the opposition in syria. ghassan hitto lived in the u.s. for decades but now he will govern parts of syria controlled by rebel forces. members of the syrian national coalition met in istanbul, turkey. they voted to elect hitto who moved to turkey last year to help coordinate the opposition. the coalition plans to launch an interim government for northern syria which is under rebel control. 70,000 syrians have died in two years of figh
been working closely with many of our partners year today to educate about these -- many of our partners year today to educate about these issues. also in terms of board guidance. i want to thank all of you for coming. many of you may have assistance. i know many merchants could not be here. please do it share this information with other merchants in the area. we have virginia from the office of small business. we have roger from the bar association. no carla johnson from the office of disability. -- we have carla johnson from the office of disability. i want to especially it acknowledge my colleague to help us get the resources and brought legal expertise to the table. i do not want to take too much of your time. thank you for coming. >> thank you, supervisor chu. i want to express my admiration for a supervisor chu's commitment to you. so, from our office, what we heard, many small businesses were receiving lawsuits regarding it the ada. tonight we will hear about the legal requirements, what has been in place. any small businesses that nderst informed as far as their obligati
. the story from our chief education correspondent rehema ellis. >> we want to go straight. >> reporter: this may look like an outing for a boating club, but it's a public school gym class. >> keep going! >> you have to use your arms and it also helps you move your legs, too. >> you live longer, stay healthy. >> everything's fun. >> reporter: in miami dade county where 14% of middle school students are obese, there is a new approach to physical education. catering to kids' interests. >> i like the bikes. that's my favorite. >> reporter: to get them up, moving and healthy. >> we are seeing kids over weight losing an average of eight pounds a semester. kids with eating disorders are putting on an average of two pounds a semester. >> reporter: despite strained finances for gym programs, no money turned out to be no problem. why? nearly a decade ago the school district's phys ed director enlisted the help of parents, the principal and superintendents and began raising money. >> we have been able to secure outside grant money, community resources. >> reporter: a school without a gym turned a
programs through her church. [speaker not understood] received her education from oakwood college and california university where she obtained a master's degree in psychology. ms.felder started in the city as a clerk with child crisis and worked her way up to management, to the management level and is now the director of the city's integrated response system. she has demonstrated exemplary leadership, administratively and in the field. she is well loved by her staff as you can tell, and lead her staff by example, working with a team and not above them. she has a hands-on -- she's a hand on manager who doesn't just sit behind her desk, but works closely with her team. and directly with victims and their loved ones. she believes that mental health services need to be brought directly to communities. she is proactive in setting her team to neighborhoods with the greatest need for behavioral health services to engage the community through activities and to build the relationships and trust so that those who may need services and support can be more open to seek the help that they need
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